Category Archives: Gardening Tips

Transplanting Tips for a Successful Garden

Once days lengthen and temperatures warm, it’s time to move seedlings out into the garden. Ideal transplant times vary from plant to plant, depending on the growing temperatures each prefers. In many cases, transplant times (often provided on seed packets) are given in terms of days before or after the last spring frost date for…
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How to Get Rid of Ants Invasion Naturally

How to Get Rid of Ants Invasion Naturally There’s nothing like walking into your kitchen first thing in the morning, bleary eyed and ready for your morning cup of coffee only to find that your home has been invaded. Marching one-by-one in a seemingly endless stream, these tiny insects are one of life’s biggest pests…
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How to Grow Blueberry Plants

The modern blueberry is a 20th century invention. Before the 1900s, the only way to enjoy these North American natives was to find them in the wild. Then, scientists started to unlock the secrets of cultivating blueberries, and we’re glad they did!  Plump, juicy berries are now easy to grow in your backyard on bushes…
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DIY – Self Watering Tomato Buckets

“You can never have too many tomato plants, but what happens when you run out of room in the garden. Tomatoes are probably the most versatile plant you can grow; They are used in everything from Tomato Sauce to Ketchup,  Espagnole Sauce to Bloody Marys’ (Yum!). Growing tomato plants in 5 gallon buckets is nothing…
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How to Improve Your Garden Soil

Whether you garden on clay, silt or sand there are steps you can take to improve your garden soil and get the best performance from your plants. How can I improve my garden soil? Some plants are well adapted to growing in certain types of soil, although even these plants may struggle to cope if…
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How to: Planting Tomatoes

Planting Tomatoes Tomatoes need at least six to eight hours of sun a day to produce well. Full sun is best, especially in cooler, more northern climates. Provide well-drained soil with a pH around 6.0 to 6.8. In cold-climate areas, plant in spring after frost danger is past. In hot climates, plant when temperatures begin…
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How to Grow Beautiful Grape Hyacinth

Grape Hyacinth is a popular spring flowering bulb. This wee little bulb, puts on a big, bold show in early spring, Commonly called Grape Hyacinth, it is a member of the Lily family. Grape Hyacinth native to central Europe and the Mediterranean, as well as central and western Asia. The bright, attractive flowers produce a…
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Bell Peppers – Growing Guide

Peppers are a tender, warm-season crop. They resist most pests and offer something for everyone: spicy, sweet or hot, and a variety of colors, shapes and sizes. For this page, we will focus on sweet bell peppers. Planting Start seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before last spring frost date. The temperature must be at least 70 degrees F…
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Tips for Making a Raised-Bed Garden

Raised-bed garden is popular because it's relatively easy to build, plant, weed, and maintain. Since the soil can drain sooner and warm up faster in spring, they enable you to plant earlier in the season. You can make a garden of permanent or temporary raised beds. Here's how. Tools and Materials Bricks, rocks, concrete blocks, naturally…
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Gardening – Follow Nature’s Signs!

For centuries, farmers took their cues for planting times from observing what’s happening in nature—such as bird migration, the emergence of insects and amphibians (like peepers), and the flowering of native plants. Nature's Signs: Phenology Phenology is the study of periodic plant and animal life cycle events and how these are influenced by seasonal and interannual variations in…
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DIY – Cheap Cedar Raised Beds

Cedar raised beds make gardening easier, more accessible, more economical, and more efficient. But often a cedar raised beds can cost hundreds of dollars. With this plan, I figured out how to create cedar raised beds - deep ones - for about $10 each. Here's those cedar raised beds I built for $10 bucks each .…
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Compost – a Recipe for Success!

The first week of May (2nd-8th) is International Composting Awareness week. So I thought I’d give you my recipe for compost and explain why is it important. The purpose of composting is to break down garden and kitchen 'waste' into humus which can then be added to the garden to supply nutrients in a form…
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What Is Organic Gardening?

The word organic is bandied about a lot in connection with food and gardens these days, but what does organic gardening really mean? That depends on the context. In simple terms, organic gardening could be described as growing in harmony with nature, without using synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides or other such products that upset the balance…
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Dealing with Japanese Beetles

The Japanese bettle, or Popillia japonica, is a nasty invasive species that has infested most of the Eastern United States after being first detected in New Jersey in 1916. This beetle is often confused with a lady bug or lady beetle, the little red or pink and black dotted beetles living in your garden. I…
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7 Things First Time Gardeners Should Know

First time gardeners out there, here are seven things you should know before you jump in and get your hands too dirty. 1. PLANTS NEED WATER AND WATER’S NOT FREE That is, unless you have a well. If you’re fortunate to have your own well, then go ahead and skip on to #2. Otherwise, hear…
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How to Start Lawn From Seed

To start new lawns, many people wonder which is better: laying sod or sowing seeds. While laying sod is fast and produces high-quality new lawns, seeding lawns is cheaper and offers a wider variety of grass types. Check with your county extension to learn which grass types are best for your region, or just check…
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